Kohlrabi Pickles – 3 Ways

by lydia on November 12, 2013

Kohlrabi shares its botanical name, brassica oleracea, with its close relative, broccoli. But kohl, meaning “cabbage,” and rabi, meaning “turnip,” better describes this delicate but unusual vegetable. Many botanists believe kohlrabi is actually a hybridization of these two root vegetables. Kohlrabi resembles a root vegetable, but actually the edible globe is the modified swollen stem. The edible leaves jut from the globe portion of the kohlrabi like sparse hairs on a head, giving this vegetable its distinctive look. ~ Source: ‘From Asparagus to Zucchini: A Guide to Cooking Farm-Fresh Seasonal Produce. 3rd Edition

 

Kohlrabi is likely available in early spring and even fall, depending on the growing season and where you live. It thrives in cool weather. It has been available at my local farmer’s market for the past month and I’ve been stocking up on it since it stores really well, much like cabbage does.

Kohlrabi

There are two varieties of kohlrabi, purple and light green or white. The purple variety is a bit spicier than the more mildly sweet white/light green kohlrabi. I like both and suggest trying each type. You can also use the leaves, either raw or cooked. Be sure to look for smaller kohlrabi, the bigger ones tend to get tough and lose their delicate flavor. Look for kohlrabi that is about 3 inches or so around. When you store kohlrabi, store the leaves and globe separately. Often times my guinea pig gets the greens, he loves them! The globe will last about a month in the fridge, so long as it doesn’t accidentally ‘freeze’. (yes, I’ve had that happen since my fridge can be wonky). I’ve even kept kohlrabi on my screen porch in the fall for quite some time, so long as the temperature stays consistent this is another option(saves on fridge space too). The greens, however, need to be used as soon as possible.

Kohlrabi is so versatile, it’s great raw or cooked. I remember when I first got kohlrabi in my CSA pick up many moons ago, I fell absolutely in love. I found it so easy to put into many dishes. With it’s mild flavor it really is a great veggie to try in many ways and easy to get kids to like it as well. Unfortunately, it’s still unfamiliar to many home cooks. My hope is that I get to introduce this wonderfully unique vegetable to those who may not have yet tried it.

Kohlrabi has a decent amount of vitamin C, about 44 mg per half cup. But keep in mind the vitamin C content get lost with cooking. However, if you ferment it, you are going to enhance that vitamin C. Today, I’m sharing 3 easy peasy rcipes for kohlrabi pickles. This is a nice way to have veggies on hand at the ready to serve with any meal or even enjoy as a snack. Not to mention, to get a nice little hit of vitamin C along with enzymes and probiotics to ward off a cold!

Kohlrabi-Pickles-2

Garlic Kohlrabi Pickles

Ingredients:

  • kohlrabi, sliced into slivers about 3 cups
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • a couple thyme sprigs OR fresh oregano sprigs
  • 2% brine

Instructions:

  1. Place the kohlrabi sticks into a 1 liter anaerobic vessel. Add the garlic and thyme sprigs.
  2. Make a 2% brine: 19 grams of sea salt per quart of water.
  3. Pour the brine over the veggies up to the shoulder of the jar.
  4. Place a weight or bowl over the veggies to keep them submerged.
  5. Clamp down the lid, add the airlock making sure it has water to the fill line.
  6. Ferment in a dark cupboard for 5-7 days until the bubble activity dies down.
http://divinehealthfromtheinsideout.com/2013/11/kohlrabi-pickles-3-ways/

IMG_2090

Curry Kohlrabi Pickles

Ingredients:

  • kohlrabi - about 3 cups cut into 1/2 inch cubes
  • 2 teaspoons to 1 Tbsp. curry powder (depending on your taste preferences)
  • 2% brine

Instructions:

  1. Place the kohlrabi cubes into a 1 liter vessel.
  2. Sprinkle the curry powder over the kohlrabi as you add it into the jar.
  3. Make your 2% brine: 19 grams of fine grind sea salt per quart of water.
  4. Pour the brine over the veggies up to the shoulder.
  5. Place a weight or bowl over the veggies to keep them submerged.
  6. Clamp down the lid, add the airlock filled with water to the line.
  7. Place in a dark cupboard to ferment for 5-7 days, until the bubble activity dies down.
http://divinehealthfromtheinsideout.com/2013/11/kohlrabi-pickles-3-ways/

Kohlrabi-Pickles

Chili Lime Kohlrabi Pickles

Ingredients:

  • kohlrabi - about 3 cups cut into equal sticks
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 2 Tablespoons maple syrup
  • 2 Tablespoons lime juice
  • 2% brine

Instructions:

  1. Place the kohlrabi sticks into a 1 liter vessel.
  2. Sprinkle the chili powder and red pepper flakes into the jar as you add the sticks.
  3. Add the lime juice and maple syrup.
  4. Make your 2% brine: 19 grams of sea salt per quart of water.
  5. Pour the brine over the veggies in the jar -up to the shoulder. Place a weight or bowl on top to keep the veggies submerged.
  6. Clamp down the lid, and add the airlock filled with water to the line.
  7. Ferment until the activity dies down about 5-7 days.
http://divinehealthfromtheinsideout.com/2013/11/kohlrabi-pickles-3-ways/

 

Equipment Needed For Basic Brine Ferments


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{ 8 comments… read them below or add one }

Tina July 10, 2014 at 12:52 am

I’m excited to try all of these ferments as I just got the Probiotic Jars that you recommended! Thanks!
One question about Kohlrabi…is it similar to cabbage in that it needs a long ferment?

Reply

lydia July 10, 2014 at 12:44 pm

No -kohlrabi does not need to ferment as long as cabbage!

Enjoy your jars!

Reply

Tina July 10, 2014 at 2:37 pm

Great! I love Kohlrabi! Have you ever made kohlrabi kraut? If so, any suggestions?

Reply

lydia July 10, 2014 at 4:33 pm

If you mean kohlrabi with cabbage then you’d ferment it like you would kraut (the 10-12 weeks). I’ve done shredded kohlrabi slaw and that is a shorter ferment and quite good!

Reply

Tina July 10, 2014 at 4:49 pm

Sorry..yes I mean a shredded slaw with just kohlrabi. What’s your recipe?

Reply

lydia July 10, 2014 at 5:13 pm

Hmm, I don’t remember really – I just make it up as I go! 😉

Use this recipe as a template for the ratios of salt to shredded veggies etc…..http://divinehealthfromtheinsideout.com/2012/11/spiced-apple-beet-slaw/

Candace May 23, 2015 at 10:38 pm

Will this keep long term in cold storage? Say, 6 months plus, unopened?

Reply

lydia May 26, 2015 at 6:23 am

Very possibly – be sure to switch to a smaller vessel when the jar gets 2/3 or 1/2 full – keeping as much air out will ensure it lasts longer.

Reply

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