How To Never Need Collagen Injections!

by lydia on February 4, 2014

feet are richest in collagen and gelatin and will make the most gelatin-rich broth. – See more at: http://cavegirleats.com/b-r-o-t-h/#sthash.Vgt6CdLN.dpuf
feet are richest in collagen and gelatin and will make the most gelatin-rich broth. – See more at: http://cavegirleats.com/b-r-o-t-h/#sthash.Vgt6CdLN.dpuf

Believe it or not, collagen injections are becoming more and more popular and wide spread, especially among women. More women as they age are finding their skin, hair, nails and more to not be holding up quite like they would hope. Is nature really cruel or is there a way to avoid this aspect of aging?

The truth is, we’ve strayed far from a traditionally healthy diet in this day and age and it’s definitely taking it’s toll on our bodies, figures and youthful appearance. I’m not here to say we shouldn’t age, but I do think nature intended for it to be a bit more graceful. I don’t know about you, but I never plan on needing collagen injections! Wanna know how I plan to manage that?

Collagen Makes Us Strong & Youthful

Collagen is found in your joints, bones, skin, hair and just about everywhere in between. Collagen is type of protein that helps to give our skin the ability to move, stretch and rebound into shape. The epidermis and dermis are full of collagen. Collagen is throughout the body and helps to keep cells together in all your glands, organs from your brain to your bones and your liver and lungs. Your body is about 15% (dry weight) pure collagen, it’s the most prevalent form of protein in your body. Without collagen we would fall to pieces, literally. One of the best ways to have healthy collagen and help collagen heal, as well as joints and skin is to eat some collagen.

Gelatin-1

Eating meat on the bone, a practice not as common today as it once was, and consuming bone broths in soups, stews and sauces is one such way to get collagen into your body. Bone broth is rich in glucosamine, which helps to build joints and is capable of rejuvenating your body, no matter what your age. Consider it a youth serum if you will. When you consume bone broth, rich in glycosaminoglycans, you are getting collagen in the most assimilable way and sending it right to where your body needs it the most.

The glycosaminoglycans from the bones in your broth will naturally adhere to the collagen anywhere in your body. It helps to moisten dry skin, support your ligaments keeping them supple and go a long way to making you to look and feel younger. Also, did you know that cellulite fat is lacking in collagen? If you have a lot of cellulite consider your diet. Are you getting enough animal fats and meats on the bone or bone broth.

Traditional cultures utilized all the parts of a pastured animal, from the nose-to-the-tail. Cultures all around the world used animal bones, feet, heads, hooves and so on in their cooking. Feet are rich in collagen and make the most gelatin-rich broth  (see the image below- kinda looks like jello jigglers ‘eh?). Collagen injections were never heard of long ago, nor were they needed. We needed to adopt the practices of our ancestors and make sure to eat animal foods, bones and make broth (read more about the benefits of bone broth here).

Gelatin-4

Pig’s Feet Broth….yes, pig’s feet, is very rich in gelatin. Since I purchase a half hog each year, I always have lots of variety of bones and make sure to ask for the feet. Chicken feet and beef feet also make excellent gelatin rich stock as well. Always be sure to use a variety of bones and ask your farmer for the feet for your stock too. I love pork bones, for some reason they always make excellent stock. The trick is not to heat the stock too high but to keep it at a low simmer the entire time. I use my slow cooker on low or warm overnight for about 24 hours. The end result is as you see above, gorgeous gelatin rich stock!

Gelatin-5

How To Never Need Collagen Injections!

Ingredients:

  • Pig's Feet
  • Water
  • Celery
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Apple Cider Vinegar
  • 6 quart slow cooker

Instructions:

  1. Place the pig's feet into your slow cooker. Add enough water to cover by an inch or two.
  2. Add about 1/4-1/2 cup or so of apple cider vinegar and all the vegetables. Let stand 1 hour. (the vinegar will help to draw the minerals out of the bones.)
  3. Bring to a gentle boil on high, and remove any scum that rises to the top.
  4. Reduce heat to low, cover and simmer for 6 to 24 hours. I always do a full 24 hours, because the longer you cook it the richer the flavor will be. But do not let it get too hot and bubble too much, you want a very gentle bubble action. Some slow cookers get too hot if kept on low for 24 hours, so it's best to switch it to the warm setting if this is the case. Or you can simple simmer it for a shorter duration. Strain off the broth and start another batch with some fresh vegetables. I usually do at least 3 batches of 24 hour broth, strain and add new veggies. Each batch gets a good amount of gelatin in it.
  5. It is key to chill down the stock rather quickly. Place in a sink full of ice in a pot, or move outside if the weather where you are is cold enough to chill it down. Then place in the fridge for up to a week. Freeze for longer storage. Always allow the stock to fully cool before refrigerating.
http://divinehealthfromtheinsideout.com/2014/02/how-to-never-need-collagen-injections/

Gelatin-2

Want to learn all the ins and outs of making bone broth at home? My good friend Patty of Loving Our Guts has an amazing eBook all about broth making. Broth Elixir of Life includes the whys, the hows and all the practicals you can think of, plus numerous recipes. If you are new to broth making or semi-new and plan to include it as a staple in your diet, this eBook is a must have! (click the banner below)

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Lydia - Color - December 2013Lydia Joy Shatney is a certified Nutritional Therapist Practitioner through the Nutritional Therapy Association. Additionally, she is the chapter leader for the Weston A. Price Foundation in Delaware County, Pa. (Find the group here on Facebook). Lydia is also a member of the Nourished Living Network. Lydia founded Divine Health From The Inside Out in March of 2010. You can find Lydia on Facebook, Twitter & Pinterest. Sign up for the Divine Health From The Inside Out newsletter! Pick up a copy of Lydia’s eBook; ‘Divine Dinners: Gluten-Free, Nourishing, Family-Friendly Meals’.

Lydia offers specialized step by step counseling to transform your health. Personalized consultations to suit your specific needs are offered via phone or in person. Lydia offers a variety of packages offered to suit your individual needs. Lydia also offers 3 online courses: Heal Your Gut, Revitalize Your Health and A Calm Mind. Contact Lydia today to get started as well as to learn more about what she has to offer you!

 

 

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{ 14 comments… read them below or add one }

Annie February 6, 2014 at 10:04 am

Hi Lynda
Do you eat the broth like jello style ? or do you mix water and reheat over the stove ?…or…
thanks
Annie

Reply

lydia February 6, 2014 at 10:34 am

Annie,

I do eat it in soups, stews, gravies, sauces and such. If I make gelatin I use Great Lakes gelatin. I don’t eat it off the spoon like in the picture if that is what you are wondering.

Reply

Debra E February 6, 2014 at 8:51 pm

Do you ever reduce your stock once it is made, you know to conserve space in your fridge or freezer? I usually do but if the high heat breaks down the collagen then this might not be such a good practice!

Reply

lydia February 6, 2014 at 9:21 pm

I do not reduce it. I’d only do that if I wanted to store it for long term to have on hand for emergency purposes.

Reply

robinakagoatmom February 23, 2014 at 8:16 am

I have to say the 2 best things I’ve done for my health and looks has been quit smoking over 2 decades ago and resumed making broths/stocks 8 years ago. My skin and joints, energy all are much improved. I have a chest freezer so that helps with storage. I find batch cooking on a rainy weekend works best for me. I portion up in various sizes including ice cube trays, later placed in bags. So I can grab a few cubes when ever a bit of beef, chicken stock would enhance a recipe. Food taste so much better with real not full of artificial junk like store canned or boullion cubes etc. I didn’t know about the cellulite connection but have noted besides losing weight since switching to real food I have very little cellulite left.

Reply

jai February 23, 2014 at 9:01 am

wt is the souce of collagen for vageterian person

Reply

lydia February 23, 2014 at 2:45 pm

Jai, I’m sorry but there isn’t a direct replacement. Collagen comes from joints and bones and skin.

Reply

jo February 23, 2014 at 11:52 am

How do you clean and sanitize feet before making the broth?

Reply

lydia February 23, 2014 at 4:45 pm

The butcher you get them from should have already done it for you – be sure to ask how they prep them Jo.

Reply

Debra E February 24, 2014 at 9:19 am

I put my broth in the ice bath and then promptly forgot it before going to bed! It was in the water probably about 12 hours total before it got refrigerated. I’m pretty sure I shouldn’t consume it but wanted to know you thoughts on if it would still be good.

Reply

lydia February 24, 2014 at 9:35 am

Was the ice bath still cold when you checked it?

Reply

Debra E February 24, 2014 at 12:57 pm

Not cold but cool. I keep the house at 68 at night.

Reply

lydia February 25, 2014 at 8:33 am

I”m gonna point you to the food safety guidelines on this one, so you can make an informed decision; http://www.idph.state.il.us/about/fdd/fdd_fs_foodservice.htm

Reply

Debra E February 24, 2014 at 3:26 pm

It wasn’t cold, but somewhat cool. I keep the house at 68 degrees at night.

Reply

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